15 Things To Learn About New York Before You Go There

15 Things To Learn About New York Before You Go There

The Big Apple offers a wide range of things to do, places to visit, and foods to try. Before you land in the “City of Dreams”, however, there are some facts you simply must know about the city. So, let’s get started with some great tips from the pros;

  1. Wear Comfy Shoes

“If you are spending the day touring around New York, wear comfortable, close-toed shoes. You will be surprised by just how much walking you end up doing, and the last thing you want is to suffer through blisters and aches. You will also rarely see someone in New York City wearing sandals. Your feet will get stepped on in the subway, plus the ground can just be kind of gross (to put it plainly).”

Brian Donovan, CEO Timeshatter

  1. Rule of The Road

“If you plan on driving while visiting New York, don’t leave home without knowing this critical rule of the road: In New York City, it is illegal to turn on a red light (unless a posted sign specifically indicates otherwise). This is a huge surprise for first-time visitors—particularly those who are renting a car. In most other American cities, drivers are allowed to turn right on red after a full stop. Not in NYC!” (Lauren Levy)

  1. Restaurants

“Don’t even think about trying to get into a well known restaurant without a reservation made at least 3 weeks in advance. For lesser known (but still delicious) restaurants, you can often get away with booking only 5 days in advance. The easiest way to get a reservation is to do it online at Resy.com or OpenTable.com. If you don’t have any luck there, try calling.”

Lauren Levy, adensmom.com

  1. The Running Trails

“Living in New York City has taught me one thing that everyone needs to know before they visit: there is an amazing amount of running trails. These include massive tree-lined trails such as those in Central Park, beautiful river views on the West Side Highway, and challenging urban bridges such as the Manhattan Bridge. Whether you are a runner or an occasional jogger, New York City might surprise you at how many miles of running trails are easily accessible and not filled with traffic.”

Michelle Bagnato, fitness blogger at Bliss from Balance

  1. It Is Not Difficult To Navigate The Terrain

“And there’s the adage about New Yorkers dressing in all black. Although this isn’t entirely true, it is prevalent during the winter months. Check the website before going to a theatre, concert hall, or upscale restaurant. However, most places have a mix of clothing ranging from jeans and tee-shirts to dresses and heels. To lunch in the West Village, you’re wearing zip-off hiking pants. You will not be treated badly, but you will be treated as if you were a tourist.” (Emily Ray)

  1. Sidewalks Have Traffic Rules

“Okay, not the kind of rules that will get you a ticket if you don’t follow them. If you don’t want to be run over by an angry local. When in doubt, treat walking down a crowded sidewalk as if it were a race. If you’re driving on the highway, stay to the right, don’t brake suddenly, and pull over to an out-of-the-way spot if you’re distracted and moving too slowly.”

Emily Ray, Traveling With Your Cat

  1. Traffic

“Yes, the traffic is as bad as they say it is.” (Mia Clarke)

  1. Transportation

“You’ll find transportation in NYC beats that public any other place you’ve been to because this is the densest city in the US.” (Mia Clarke)

  1. The People

“The people are definitely not all friendly but most of them are just too busy to care about anything that doesn’t impact their day-to-day life in a direct way.” (Mia Clarke)

  1. Payments

“You can use cash there, and they take credit cards everywhere.”

Mia Clarke, Owner at InvertPro

  1. Try The Bagels and The Hotdogs

“Their bagels and hotdogs are out of this world: The New York slice is something do die for, but you won’t experience bagels and hotdogs like you would in these parts. They say there’s something in the water, and maybe there is. But if you’re in NYC, save the pizza for the next trip. Once you try the bagels and dogs, you’ll be coming back for more.” (Jack Miller)

  1. People are Actually Nice

“The one thing people would say about NYC folks is that their obnoxious, rude, and unfriendly. I’ve so far experienced the exact opposite whenever I’d visit. The lady in the nearby bodega never failed to greet me a good morning every time I dropped by. I once dropped a pair of earphones and a lady followed me to hand it over personally. Don’t let stereotypes get to you is what I’m saying. Enjoy your own experiences.” (Jack Miller)

  1. A Trip to NYC should be AT LEAST a Week. 

“Manhattan alone is a goldmine for an entire afternoon of activities. But if you spend an afternoon in Queens, you’ll discover an entirely new culinary enclave that you wouldn’t want to leave. NYC isn’t a weekender. If you’re from out of town, allot AT LEAST a week to be well-acquainted enough with her.”

Jack Miller is the founder of How I Get Rid Of 

  1. Adhere to Taxi and Ride-Hailing App Etiquette. 

“For yellow cabs, if the numbers on the roof of the cab are lit up, it is available to offer you a ride. If the light is turned off, there is someone inside. To hail a cab, simply stand on the curb and extend your hand. Also, avoid inadvertently upstreaming someone. People receive first dibs if they were already standing on a street corner—or a little farther down the block, within sight—with their hand out, waiting for a cab.. If you steal a cab from someone who was there first, people become quite agitated, so make sure you look about before waving down the first cab you see.” (Imani Francies)

  1. Taking the Ferry Across the East River

“Ferry is a fantastic way to travel around and get spectacular skyline views when visiting New York City. This small boat travels down the East River, making stops from Long Island City in Queens to the Financial District in lower Manhattan.A one-way ferry ticket costs $4, which is somewhat more expensive than a $2.75 MTA subway card; nevertheless, the vistas, fresh air, and lack of people more than compensate for the price difference.”

Imani Francies is a Travel Expert with Clearsurance.com