How Much Snow Does New York City Get?

How Much Snow Does New York City Get?

The city is known for its normal long, cold winters. There are usually about four to six light snowfalls in New York City between the months of December and February. However, there are also two or three heavy storms with deep accumulations throughout wintertime as well too. 

The New York City winter season is in full swing and it’s already a huge success for the city as they have surpassed their seasonal average snowfall of 28.5 inches this year!

These types of blizzard-type conditions can cause school closings which makes it difficult to get around if you have a car because traffic becomes even worse than usual during these times! The first major storm will hit near mid January while the last one tends to happen just before everyone’s favorite holiday season begins – Christmas time!

The most interesting question is when does it snow in New York? The answer: typically, it starts to snow around December and the season ends by March. January and February are two likely months for big snows but you should always be prepared no matter what month or time frame that falls under because Mother Nature can’t predict everything!

The snowfall in November and April is extremely rare, but it does happen. The rest of the months are far more likely to have some kind of precipitation than not.

The New York City winter season is in full swing and it’s already a huge success for the city as they have surpassed their seasonal average snowfall of 28.5 inches this year alone, with 32 inch measurements currently being recorded at present time.. This number means that there was around 2 feet more than last year’s total which had officially accumulated only 4.8″? What does all these extra goodies mean? It will be easy to see why families flock here during holiday times when you compare how beautiful everything looks!

The snowfall in New York can be extreme, but that’s because it ranges so widely. Sometimes we get hardly any at all and other years see tons!